Final Fight 2
  • Genre:
    • Beat 'Em Up
  • Platform:
    • SNES
  • Developer:
    • Capcom
  • Publisher:
    • Capcom
  • Released:
    • JP 05/22/1993
    • US 08/15/1993
    • UK December 1993
Score: 80%

This review was published on 10/22/2017.

Final Fight 2 is a side-scrolling beat 'em up video game developed and published by Capcom for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System and Super Famicom. It was originally released in Japan on May 22, 1993, North America on August 15, 1993, and Europe in December 1993. As its name implies, this is the proper sequel to Final Fight, which was originally a coin operated arcade game developed by Capcom that came out in 1989. After hitting it big in the arcades, the first Final Fight was ported to many home platforms in the early 1990s, the most popular port being the one on the SNES. However, the SNES port of Final Fight was far from the best version, as it removed lots of stuff. A revised edition of the SNES port, called Final Fight Guy, came out a little later, but it still failed to reinstate most of the missing content and features. As if to make up for all of that, Capcom decided to make Final Fight 2 an SNES exclusive, building the whole game from the ground up for the console. This resulted in Final Fight 2 being vastly superior to the SNES ports of the first game in the series, but about on par with the original arcade version of Final Fight.

Image

In the first game, a nasty gang known as Mad Gear terrorized Metro City by kidnapping Jessica, the daughter of Mike Haggar, the mayor. This was no ordinary mayor, though, because was a proficient wrestler before he entered the political landscape. Along with Jessica's boyfriend, Cody, and his best friend, Guy, Haggar defeated Mad Gear and successfully rescued Jessica. After peace was restored to Metro City, Cody took Jessica on a romantic vacation, Guy left on a journey to hone his skills, and Haggar returned to his job as mayor. Things didn't remain peaceful, however. The Mad Gear gang secretly rebuilt itself under the rule of a new leader and began doing dirty deeds once again. They start off their second debut by kidnapping Guy's fiancee, Rena, along with her father and Guy's former sensei, Genryusai. With Guy nowhere to be found, Rena's younger sister, Maki Genryusai, phones Haggar for help. Accompanied by his pal, Carlos Miyamoto, Haggar meets up with Maki and the three of them get ready to pound some punks.

Image

For the most part, the basic mechanics and controls are the same as before. You're able to saunter around in eight directions on the ground using the trusty SNES d-pad, jump with the B button, and attack with the Y button. If you press Y while in the air, you'll do an aerial attack. Of course, these controls can be changed in the options menu. There's also an option to bind the special attack to an unused button on the controller, but the same effect can be triggered by pressing the jump and attack buttons simultaneously. Speaking of, the special attack damages nearby foes in exchange for a tiny bit of your life bar. Grabs also work exactly as they did in the first game. That's to say, you grab enemies by walking into them, then throw them by holding the desired direction on the d-pad and pressing the attack button. Alternatively, you can press the attack button by itself to hit grabbed enemies a couple of times without throwing them. If you played the first Final Fight, then you'll know how to play this.

Image

Like the arcade version of the first Final Fight, there are three playable characters and they all play slightly differently. With the exception of the mighty Haggar, this game brings two new characters to the table. Those characters are the aforementioned Maki Genryusai and Carlos Miyamoto. Maki is a female master of the sacred ninja arts, prioritizing speed over power. Carlos is a South American martial artist of Japanese descent, which is more than a little weird. He's a well balanced fighter armed with a sword, though it's mostly just for show, as he only uses it to do special attacks. As for Haggar, he's the same as before, pile driving punks into other punks. The only disappointing thing about the characters is that Carlos and Maki are basically just clones of Cody and Guy from the first Final Fight. They really only differ in looks and voice samples. On the flipside, unlike the SNES ports of the first Final Fight, but like the original arcade version, a second player can jump in at any time for some cooperative goodness.

Image

In Final Fight, your fists and feet usually do the talking, but there are occasionally weapons. Final Fight 2 isn't any different in that regard. The environment frequently contains breakable metal drums, which frequently contain items. Some of these items simply give you points, some of them replenish your health, and some of them are weapons. Weapons extend your range and damage output, but they're temporary, as you'll drop them when injured or after most screen transitions. There are a total of three types of weapons: a tonfa, a plank of wood, and a throwing knife. The knife is used as a projectile, but it immediately vanishes after thrown. However, similar to Cody from the last game, Carlos is able to use the knife as a melee weapon without throwing it. With the exception of some weapons being different, all this functions exactly as it did in the first game. One minor difference is that weapons are much rarer now, but that's about it.

Image

Aside from the two "new" characters, the biggest difference between this game and the first Final Fight is the locations you fight through. Instead of restricting you to urban areas within the United States, Final Fight 2 has you beating people up all over the world. On your violent journey, you'll visit such locations as Hong Kong, France, Holland, England, Italy, and Japan. This means that the stages are far more varied from a visual and musical standpoint, though they don't play all that differently. That same sentiment extends to the enemies, which look different, but function rather similarly to most of the foes from the first Final Fight. There are, however, some areas wherein the screen scrolls vertically, which is something that wasn't in the first game. One stage also changes things up with landmines. Like Final Fight Guy, Final Fight 2 has different difficulties, but unlike it, the best ending is only accessible upon beating the toughest difficulty level. Other than its apparent unoriginality, there's really nothing wrong with Final Fight 2. The act of beating people up is still entertaining, plus the well drawn graphics are fun to look at. Also, similar to most ports of the first Final Fight, versions of Final Fight 2 released outside of Japan were slightly altered. For example, the female enemies were changed into men, because Capcom thought that the international market wouldn't approve of violence against women.

Image

As with the first Final Fight, there are bonus stages. Depending on how quickly you complete each bonus stage, you'll get more points and possibly even extra lives. There are two types of bonus stages in total. The first bonus stage is the one where you wreck someone's car using weapons, which is stupidly fun. This thing originally originated in the original Final Fight and later appeared in Street Fighter II, making it rather iconic. The second type of bonus stage in Final Fight 2 is mostly new, and it tasks you with destroying metal drums that periodically light on fire. If you attack a drum while it's fiery, you'll be injured, so you must wait for the fire to go out before taking a shot. In stark contrast to the car wrecking mini-game, this bonus stage isn't any fun, because there's too much waiting and not enough smashing.

Image

While a vast improvement over the SNES ports of the first Final Fight, Final Fight 2 isn't much better than the original arcade version of the first game. It's not much worse, either, though. Capcom's motto has always been to not fix what isn't broken, and that's precisely what Final Fight 2 embodies. Don't mess with a winning formula and all that. If you liked the first Final Fight, then you'll probably like Final Fight 2, as well. Just don't go in expecting a wildly different experience, because it's basically a reskin.

Word Count: 1,392

Tweet